Urology

 

About Urology

Mercy Hospital is a not-for-profit surgical hospital committed to delivering 'exceptional care that makes a difference' to Otago and Southland residents. Independent specialists provide surgery that focuses on the urinary tracts of males and females, and on the reproductive system of males. Urologists are trained to diagnose, treat, and manage patients with urological disorders. The organs covered by urology include the kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, urethra, and the male reproductive organs. This surgical service is provided at our facility by the following medical specialists. For further information please seek a referral through your GP or contact your preferred specialist directly.

Consultants

Consultant photo not available
Mr Alastair Hepburn
Urologist
Consultant photo not available
Mr Serge Luke
Urologist
Dr Kampta Samalia
Dr Kampta Samalia
Urologist

Procedures / Treatments

Circumcision
The foreskin is pulled away from the body of the penis and cut off, exposing the underlying head of the penis (glans). Stitches may be required to keep the remaining edges of the foreskin in place.
Colposuspension
Incisions (cuts) are made in the abdomen (stomach) to allow access to the bladder. Tissue lying next to the bladder is attached to a solid structure within the pelvis, allowing the bladder neck to be supported, thus correcting urine leakage.
Cystourethroscopy
A long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (cystoscope) is inserted into the urinary opening and through the urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body) to your bladder. This allows the urologist to view any abnormalities in your lower urinary tract and, if necessary, take a small tissue sample to look at under the microscope (biopsy).
Nephrectomy
Incisions (cuts) are made in the side of the body, between the ribs and hip, to allow removal of one or both kidneys.
Nephrostomy
A tube is inserted into the kidney to allow urine to drain out. The tube may drain into a bag on the outside of your body (on your back) or may drain inside your body into the bladder.
Orchidopexy
A small incision (cut) is made in the groin on the side of the undescended testicle and the testicle pulled down into the scrotum. Sometimes a small cut will need to be made in the scrotum as well.
Orchiectomy
Scrotal: a small incision (cut) is made in the front of the scrotum and the testicles removed. This greatly reduces the amount of testosterone produced in the body.
Inguinal: an incision is made in the groin to remove a testicle that: is undescended from childhood, has wasted away (atrophied), or has a tumour.
Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy
A thin wire is inserted into your lower back and guided using x-ray imaging to your kidney. A small incision (cut) is then made on your back and a narrow tube is inserted and follows the guide wire to the kidney. The kidney stone(s) is then removed or broken up.
Prostatectomy
Incisions (cuts) are made in either the lower abdomen (stomach) or between the scrotum and the anus to allow removal of the enlarged parts of, or the entire, prostate gland.
Pubo-vaginal Sling
Small incisions (cuts) are made in the lower abdomen (stomach) and in the front wall of the vagina. Synthetic tissue is inserted to form a supportive sling under the urethra at the bladder neck to prevent urine leakage.
Transurethral Resection of a Bladder Tumour (TURBT)
A long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (resectoscope) is inserted into the urinary opening, through the urethra and into the bladder. Instruments are passed through the resectoscope and the tumour removed.
Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP)
A long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (resectoscope) is inserted into the urinary opening of the penis and through the urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body) to your bladder. The urologist is then able to view the prostate gland and, by passing an instrument through the resectoscope, is able to remove the part of the gland that has become enlarged.
Ureteroscopy
A long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (ureteroscope) is inserted into the urinary opening, through the urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body) and bladder to the ureters (the two tubes that drain urine from the kidneys to the bladder). This allows the urologist to view and, in some cases, treat any problems in the ureters.
Urethroplasty
An incision (cut) is made in the penis and the narrowed part of the urethra (the tube that carries urine to the outside of your body) is removed and the urethra rejoined.
In balloon urethroplasty, a thin tube with a balloon attached is inserted into the opening of the penis. When it reaches the narrowed part of the urethra, the balloon is inflated, thus widening the urethra.
Vasectomy
A tiny incision (cut) is made in the scrotum and a short length of the vas deferens (the tube carrying sperm away from the testicles where it is produced) is removed.

This information has been provided by https://www.healthpoint.co.nz, helping people better understand and use New Zealand health services.

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