Gynaecology

 

About Gynaecology

Mercy Hospital is a not-for-profit surgical hospital committed to delivering 'exceptional care that makes a difference' to Otago and Southland residents. Independent specialists provide services related to the functions and diseases specific to women and girls, especially those affecting the reproductive system (uterus, vagina and ovaries). A number of the interventions require a scope (a scope is a long soft flexible tube, containing a camera and a light for examining the inside of a cavity). This surgical service is provided at our facility by the following medical specialists. For further information please seek a referral through your GP or contact your preferred specialist directly.

Consultants

Dr Karine Baker
Dr Karine Baker
Gynaecologist
Mr Elliot Mackenzie
Mr Elliot Mackenzie
Gynaecologist
Ms Rachael McConnell
Ms Rachael McConnell
Gynaecologist
Mr Adel Mekhail
Mr Adel Mekhail
Gynaecologist
Dr Helen Paterson
Dr Helen Paterson
Gynaecologist
Dr Barbara Richards
Dr Barbara Richards
Gynaecologist
Dr Kate Van Harselaar
Dr Kate Van Harselaar
Gynaecologist

Procedures / Treatments

Cervical Dysplasia Treatment
Lletz (Large Loop Excision of the Transformation Zone)
A thin wire loop that has an electrical current running through it is used to scrape abnormal cells from the cervix.
 
Laser Treatment of the Cervix
A laser beam (high energy light) is used to destroy abnormal cells of the cervix.
 
Cone Biopsy of the Cervix
A cone of tissue is surgically removed from the cervix for examination in the laboratory.
Colposcopy
A speculum is inserted into your vagina, as for a pap smear, and the light from a small microscope (colposcope) is focused on to the cervix. Special staining solutions are painted onto the cervix which show up abnormal cells. A biopsy (small tissue sample) may be taken to examine in the laboratory.
Colposuspension
Incisions (cuts) are made in the abdomen (stomach) to allow access to your bladder. The vagina is lifted and attached to the pelvis wall, allowing the bladder neck to be supported, thus correcting urine leakage.
Cystourethroscopy
A long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (cytoscope) is inserted into the urinary opening and through your urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder to the outside of your body) to your bladder. This allows the urologist to view any abnormalities in your lower urinary tract and, if necessary, take a small tissue sample to look at under the microscope (biopsy).
Dilatation and Curettage (D&C)
Metal dilators are inserted through your vagina and used to widen the opening to the uterus. A curette (an instrument with a flat metal loop at one end) is then used to scrape the lining of the uterus.
Endometriosis Treatment

Laparascopic: an incision (cut) is made near your navel (tummy button) and a thin tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted, allowing the surgeon a view of the internal organs. If endometriosis is being treated, small instruments are introduced through several small cuts in the lower abdomen and endometrial tissue is destroyed using an electric current or laser beam.

Abdominal (laparotomy): if endometriosis is very widespread, an incision is made in the abdomen, opening up the abdominal cavity so that the endometrial tissue can be removed.

Hysterectomy

Abdominal: an incision (cut) is made in your the abdomen (stomach) and the uterus removed.

Vaginal: an incision is made in your vagina and the uterus removed through the vagina.

Laparoscopic: several small incisions are made in your abdomen and a thin tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) inserted along with instruments that cut the connections of the uterus, allowing it to be removed through the vagina.

Hysteroscopy
A speculum is inserted into your vagina, as for a pap smear, and a long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (hysteroscope) is placed into the vagina and moved through into the uterus. This allows the surgeon to see inside the uterus and may, in some cases, show the reason for conditions such as infertility or pelvic pain. A hysteroscope may also be used to remove fibroids or polyps or to take a biopsy (small sample of tissue) for examination in the laboratory.
Laparoscopic Colporrhaphy

Anterior: an incision (cut) is made in your navel (tummy button) and several small cuts in the abdomen (stomach). A thin telescopic instrument (laparoscope) and several small instruments are inserted into the cuts and used to tighten up the front wall of the vagina to repair a cystocele (bulging of the bladder into the vaginal wall).

Posterior:  an incision is made in your navel and several small cuts in the abdomen. A laparoscope and several small instruments are inserted into the cuts and used to tighten up the back wall of the vagina to repair a rectocele (bulging of the rectum into the vaginal wall).

Myomectomy
Laparoscopic: an incision (cut) is made in your navel (tummy button) and several small cuts in the abdomen (stomach). A thin telescopic instrument (laparoscope) and several small instruments are inserted into the cuts and moved through into the uterus allowing the surgeon to view the fibroids. Small fibroids can then be removed either by introducing small surgical tools to cut them away or by vaporising them with a laser or electric current.
For large fibroids, an incision is made across your abdomen and the fibroids are cut out of the uterus.
 
Hysteroscopic: a speculum is inserted into your vagina, as for a pap smear, and a long, thin tube with a tiny camera attached (hysteroscope) is placed into the vagina and moved through into the uterus. This allows the surgeon to see inside the uterus and remove the fibroids.
Oophorectomy

Laparascopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in your abdomen (stomach) and a thin tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) inserted, allowing the surgeon a view of the ovaries. Small surgical instruments are introduced through the other cuts and are used to remove the ovary and tie off the fallopian tube.

Abdominal: an incision is made in the abdomen, the ovary is surgically removed and the fallopian tube tied off.

Ovarian Cystectomy
Several small incisions (cuts) are made in your abdomen (stomach) and a thin tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) inserted, allowing the surgeon a view of your ovaries. Small instruments are inserted through the cuts and into the ovaries, where they remove the cysts.
Pelvic Floor Repair
An incision (cut) is made in your navel (tummy button) and several small cuts in the abdomen (stomach). A thin telescopic instrument (laparoscope) is inserted through your navel, allowing the surgeon a view of the pelvic floor. Small instruments are inserted into the cuts that can lift the prolapsed or sagging organs back into position and reattach them.
Pubo-vaginal Sling
Small incisions (cuts) are made in your lower abdomen (stomach) and in the front wall of the vagina. Synthetic tissue is inserted to form a supportive sling under the urethra at the bladder neck to prevent urine leakage.
Salpingectomy

Laparoscopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in your abdomen (stomach) and a thin tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) inserted, allowing the surgeon a view of your fallopian tubes. Small surgical instruments are introduced through the other cuts and are used to remove part or all of the fallopian tube.

Abdominal (laparotomy): an incision is made in your abdomen and part or all of the fallopian tube is removed.

Vulval Biopsy or Excision
A sample of tissue (biopsy) is surgically removed from a lesion (area of damaged tissue) on your vulva. If the lesion is cut out completely, the procedure is called an excision.

This information has been provided by https://www.healthpoint.co.nz, helping people better understand and use New Zealand health services.

Back to top