General Surgery

 

About General Surgery

Mercy Hospital is a not-for-profit surgical hospital committed to delivering 'exceptional care that makes a difference' to Otago and Southland residents. Independent specialists provide surgery involving the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, liver, pancreas, gallbladder, appendix and bile ducts. They also deal with diseases involving the skin and soft tissue; and perform endoscopic procedures such as gastroscopy and colonoscopy using a scope (a scope is a long soft flexible tube, containing a camera and a light for examining the inside of a cavity e. g. stomach or bowel). This surgical service is provided at our facility by the following medical specialists. For further information please seek a referral through your GP or contact your preferred specialist directly.

Consultants

Mr Andrew Audeau
Mr Andrew Audeau
General Surgeon & Endoscopist
Mr Tom Elliott
Mr Tom Elliott
General Surgeon & Endoscopist
Mr Michael Landmann
Mr Michael Landmann
General and Breast Surgeon
Consultant photo not available
Mr Graeme Millar
General and Breast Surgeon
Consultant photo not available
Associate Professor Mark Thompson-Fawcett
General Surgeon & Endoscopist
Mr Mark Smith
Mr Mark Smith
General Surgeon
Dr Deborah Wright
Dr Deborah Wright
General Surgeon

Procedures / Treatments

Appendicectomy
Laparoscopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in the lower right abdomen (stomach) and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) in inserted. This allows the surgeon a view of the appendix and, by inserting small surgical instruments through the other cuts, the appendix can be removed.
 
Open: an incision is made in the lower right abdomen and the appendix removed.
Cholecystectomy
Laparoscopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in the abdomen (stomach) and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted. This allows the surgeon a view of the gallbladder and, by inserting small surgical instruments through the other cuts, the gallbladder can be removed.
 
Open: an abdominal incision is made and the gallbladder removed.
Colectomy
Laparoscopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in the abdomen and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted. This allows the surgeon a view of the colon and, by inserting small surgical instruments through the other cuts, part or all of the colon can be removed.
 
Open: an abdominal incision is made and part or all of the colon is removed.
Colonoscopy
A long, narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (colonoscope) is inserted into your anus and then moved along the entire colon. This allows the surgeon a view of the lining of the colon. Sometimes a biopsy (small piece of tissue) will be taken during the procedure for later examination at a laboratory. Polyps (small growths of tissue projecting into the bowel) may be removed during a colonoscopy.
Colostomy
An opening is made in the skin of the abdomen (stomach) to allow drainage of stools (faeces) from the colon into a collection bag on the outside. This may be temporary to allow time for healing of the colon or, if the entire colon has been removed, it may be permanent.
Gastrectomy
Partial: the diseased part of the stomach is removed and the remaining section is reattached to the oesophagus (food pipe) or small intestine.
 
Total: all of the stomach is removed and the oesophagus is attached directly to the small intestine.
Gastroscopy
A long, flexible tube with a tiny camera attached (gastroscope) is inserted through your mouth and moved down your digestive tract. This allows the surgeon a view of the upper part of your digestive tract i.e. oesophagus (food pipe), stomach and duodenum (top section of the small intestine). Sometimes a biopsy (small tissue sample) will need to be taken during the procedure for later examination at a laboratory.
Haemorrhoid Removal
Haemorrhoidectomy: each haemorrhoid or pile is tied off and then cut away.
 
Stapled Haemorrhoidectomy: a circular stapling device is used to pull the haemorrhoid tissue back into its normal position.
Hernia Repair
Hiatus Hernia
Laparoscopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in the abdomen (stomach) and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted. Small instruments are inserted through the other cuts, allowing the surgeon to push the hernia (part of the stomach and lower oesophagus that is bulging into the chest) back into position in the abdominal cavity. The hiatus (opening) in the diaphragm (a sheet of muscle between the chest and stomach) is tightened and the stomach is stitched into place.
 
Open: an abdominal incision is made over the hernia and the hernia is pushed back into position in the abdominal cavity. The hiatus (opening in the diaphragm) is tightened and the stomach is stitched into place.
 
Fundoplication: during the above procedures, the top part of the stomach (fundus) may be secured in position by wrapping it around the oesophagus.
 
Inguinal Hernia
Laparoscopic: several small incisions are made in the abdomen and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted. Small instruments are inserted through the other cuts, allowing the surgeon to push the hernia (part of the intestine that is bulging through the abdominal wall) back into its original position. The weakness in the abdominal wall is repaired.
 
Open: an abdominal incision is made and the hernia is pushed back into position. The weakness in the abdominal wall is repaired.
 
Umbilical Hernia
An incision is made underneath the navel (tummy button) and the hernia (part of the intestine that is bulging through the abdominal wall) is pushed back into the abdominal cavity. The weakness in the abdominal wall is repaired.
 
Incisional Hernia
Laparoscopic: several small incisions are made in the abdomen and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted. Small instruments are inserted through the other cuts, allowing the surgeon to push the hernia (part of the intestine that is bulging through the abdominal wall) back into its original position.
 
Open: an abdominal incision is made and the hernia is pushed back into position.
Parathyroidectomy
An incision (cut) is made in the front of and at the base of the neck and one or more of the parathyroid glands are removed.
Parotidectomy
An incision (cut) is made in front of the ear and runs down below the jaw line. Part or all of the parotid gland is removed.
Rectal Resection
Laparoscopic: several small incisions (cuts) are made in the abdomen (stomach) and a narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (laparoscope) is inserted. This allows the surgeon to view the rectum and, by inserting small surgical instruments through the other cuts, part or all of the rectum can be removed.
 
Open: an abdominal incision is made and part or all of the rectum removed.
Sigmoidoscopy
A long, narrow tube with a tiny camera attached (sigmoidoscope) is inserted into your anus and moved through your lower large intestine (bowel). This allows the surgeon a view of the lining of the lower large intestine (sigmoid colon). If necessary, a biopsy (small piece of tissue) may be taken for examination in the laboratory.
Skin Biopsy
Shave Biopsy: the top layers of skin in the area being investigated are shaved off with a scalpel (surgical knife) for investigation under a microscope.
 
Punch Biopsy: a small cylindrical core of tissue is taken from the area being investigated for examination under a microscope.
 
Excision Biopsy: all of the lesion or area being investigated is cut out with a scalpel for examination under a microscope.
 
Incision Biopsy: part of the lesion is cut out with a scalpel for examination under a microscope.
Skin Lesion Excision
Skin lesions such as cysts and tumours are removed by cutting around and under them with a scalpel.
Thyroidectomy
An incision (cut) is made in the front of and at the base of the neck and part or all of the thyroid gland is removed.
Varicose Veins

Sclerotherapy: a tiny needle is used to inject a chemical solution into the vein that causes the vein to collapse. This approach is recommended for small varicose veins only.

Vein stripping: the varicose veins are cut out and the veins that branch off them are tied off. The cuts (incisions) made in the skin are closed with sutures.

Phlebectomy: small cuts (incisions) are made in the leg and the varicose veins are pulled out with a tiny hook-like instrument. The cuts are closed with tape rather than sutures and, once healed, are almost invisible.

This information has been provided by https://www.healthpoint.co.nz, helping people better understand and use New Zealand health services.

Back to top